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Cryptorchidism

Synonyms: Undescended Testicle(s), Undescended Testes

What is Cryptorchidism?

Cryptorchidism, Undescended Testicle(s) or Undescended Testes is a condition where the testicle(s) fail to descend in the scrotum before birth resulting in an empty scrotal sac. Cryptorchidism can be unilateral (one side) or bilateral (both sides).

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Where can I get Cryptorchidism?

Country Cost with MedSolution
India (Please inquire for price)
All prices are in US dollars and include the cost of the procedure and minimum hospital stay. Estimates and minimum hospital stay will vary depending upon individual needs and requirements.

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What happens normally?

During development of a male fetus, testes develop in the abdomen during early part of pregnancy. They descend in the scrotum later in the pregnancy when the baby's testes starts producing testosterone hormone. If a child has Cryptorchidism, it is necessary to get it treated by surgical treatment within the first year of life.

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What are the complications associated with Cryptorchidism?

Cryptorchidism can result in damage to the testicular tissue and infertility. There is also an increased incidence of testicular cancer in individuals with Cryptorchidism. A detrimental implication of Cryptorchidism is empty scrotal sac. Surgical correction of Cryptorchidism will give your child normal looking male genitals. Testicle(s) in the abdomen are more prone to injury and trauma especially during sports or due to spontaneous torsion. Cryptorchidism is often accompanied with Inguinal Hernia.

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How is Cryptorchidism treated?

  • Medical Treatment for Cryptorchidism
    • Hormonal treatment with Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (HCG) - This hormone stimulates the Leydig cells to produce male hormone (testosterone) that might result in migration of the Cryptorchidism from the abdomen into the scrotum. Testosterone may also be injected for this purpose.
  • Surgical Treatment for Cryptorchidism
    • Open Surgery (Orchipexy) - In this procedure, the testes is pulled down into the scrotal sac through the inguinal canal.
    • Laparoscopic Orchipexy or Orchidopexy - In case where the testes are higher up in the abdomen, Laparoscope is used to pull the testes down into the scrotal sac.

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How to prepare my child for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism?

Prior hospitalization is not necessary for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism of your child, pre-operative assessment will consist of a thorough physical examination, lab. tests like CBC, blood chemistry, urinalysis. Inform your child's surgeon about all the prescription and non-prescription medication (including herbal, vitamin and mineral supplements) that your child might be taking. Please ensure that your child does not eat or drink anything at least 10 - 12 hours before the operation for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism. Do not give your child aspirin or Ibuprofen before the surgery to prevent healing problems.

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What does the procedure for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism involve?

There are two commonly used surgical approaches for correction of Cryptorchidism. Both the approaches are performed under general anesthesia on an outpatient basis, overnight hospital stay is not necessary. In the open surgery (Orchipexy) for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism, a small incision will be made in the groin, the testicle(s) will be pulled down in the scrotum through the inguinal canal and stitched to the scrotal sac to position and anchor it. In the Laparoscopic approach (Orchidopexy) for correction of Cryptorchidism, a Laparoscope is inserted through a small incision in the navel area to locate the non-palpable testis. If the testis is healthy, a second instrument is placed through a small opening in the scrotum to move the testicle into its natural position. The testicle may be located too high in the abdominal cavity to reach in a one step operation. In this case, the testicle will be freed of it previous blood supply and placed in a location in the first operation, then it will be brought down with a second operation for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism which may be performed in 6 months. The entire procedure for surgical correction of Cryptorchidism takes about one hour.

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What to expect during the recovery period following surgical correction of Cryptorchidism?

There will be some pain and discomfort following the surgical correction of Cryptorchidism which can be relieved by pain medication. Your child will spend the next few hours in the recovery room and the nursing staff will monitor his vital signs and watch for any immediate post-operative complications like excessive bleeding. Your child will be allowed to go home the same evening. The surgical sutures will dissolve on it's own and do not have to be removed. There will be some bruising and swelling in the scrotal and inguinal area that will subside in the next few days following surgical correction of Cryptorchidism.

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What is the outcome of surgical correction of Cryptorchidism?

Surgical correction of Cryptorchidism is usually successful and your child will be followed up every year to ensure normal development of the testicle in the scrotum. As a teenager, your child would be encouraged to perform monthly testicular self examination to rule out or for early detection of a testicular tumour.

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B . R . A . N . D . of surgical correction of Cryptorchidism

Benefits of surgical correction of Cryptorchidism

  • Cryptorchidism can result in damage to the testicle(s) and infertility. There is also an increased incidence of testicular cancer in Cryptorchidism. A detrimental implication of Cryptorchidism is empty scrotal sac and surgery for this problem will give your child normal looking male genitals. Cryptorchidism in the abdomen are more prone to injury and trauma especially during sports or due to spontaneous torsion. Cryptorchidism is often accompanied with Inguinal Hernia. Following timely correction of Cryptorchidism, two-thirds of adults who have had Cryptorchidism are able to father children.

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Risks of surgical correction of Cryptorchidism

  • Excessive bleeding
  • Infection
  • Allergic reaction to anesthesia
  • Post-operative breathing problem
  • Injury to testicular blood vessels

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Alternatives to surgical correction of Cryptorchidism

  • Medical Treatment for Cryptorchidism
    • Hormonal treatment with Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (HCG) - This hormone stimulates the Leydig cells to produce male hormone (testosterone) that might result in migration of the Cryptorchidism from the abdomen into the scrotum. Testosterone may also be injected for this purpose

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Now or Never

  • Cryptorchidism may not be a concern for a little child however, as he grows older increasing body awareness will definitely have an impact if he has an 'empty scrotum'. However, increased chances of testicular tumors most certainly warrants timely surgical intervention for correction of Cryptorchidism.

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Decision to have surgical correction of Cryptorchidism

  • This is a very important decision for you to take as timely surgical correction of Cryptorchidism can not only prevent your child from suffering psychological trauma of an abnormal looking 'empty' scrotum, it can protect him from testicular tumors and allow near normal testicular growth to be able to father children as an adult.

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Keywords: Testicular Tumour, Scrotal Mass, Testicular Cancer, Scrotal Swelling, Male Sex Hormones, Testosterone, Male Infertility, Male Sex Organs, Testicular Tumours, Andropause, Osteoporosis, Erectile Dysfunction, Testosterone Replacement Therapy, Adjuvant Cancer Treatment, Scrotal Implant, Sperm Banking, Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, Hormonal Therapy, Abdominal Testes, Orchipexy, Laparoscopic Orchipexy or Orchidopexy

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